Making and Makerspaces: Trends Reflection

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This topic contains 2 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Samantha Maddox 3 years, 7 months ago.

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  • #2258

    Natalie Anderson
    Participant

    When I think about Makerspace, I automatically think of SLQ, The Edge. A hub of creativity that offers workshops, activities and events to help people learn and connect
    State and public Libraries are open to all demographics, and as everybody has different ways and speeds of learning, members of the public can attend at their own pace.

    Similarly to Brit Morin, I also think that Makerspaces are places that have transported the overlooked subjects and teachers of Home economics and Manual Arts into one place, where people have finally caught up with their significane. In the near future, I would like to once again learn how to make my own clothes, just like I did in high school but have long since forgotton how.

    Now we’re living in the 21st century and a digital world, trends in Makerspaces at schools and libraries are aimed at technological innovation and aquiring 21st century skillsets. Students in schools today, can learn how to make their own games, or access 3D printers. EDtech in schools now offer instructional frameworks which encourage teachers and students to use digital tools that foster creativity along with production skills. Other than just trying to engage students, schools are convinced that these skills of creativity and production will help students succeed in high education and the workforce.

    Latest trands have been Mobile Makerspaces which can also be found in hospitals or less fortunate communities. Children at a Nashville childrens hospital, kept themselves distracted from thier daily struggles of being sick, by learning new skills and making devices specifically useful to their need. The “Mobile Makerspace” helped get the kids moving more. For example, a cart was equipped with a camera, a touchscreen computer, tablet, circuit-building kits, and even a 3D printer. Another patient, built a doorbell for her nurses, and a rotating pill-case with an LED light – so patients can find their pills at night, without turning on the overhead lights. these Mobile makespaces. Benefits of this Makerspace, not only helps childrens mental health but have been found to help with their treatment overall. Then there a companies like the Wellington MakersSpace in New Zealand, that are working towards (via crowdsourcing pledge) acquiring mobile MakerSpace to help the less fortunate individuals who don’t have transport to get much needed access to technology and learning..They hope to keep access affordable for these communities, to reduce or remove any barrier to their involvement. Makerspace education has the potential to empower young people to become agents of change in their communities.

  • #2862

    Steven Walker
    Participant

    Now we’re living in the 21st century and a digital world, trends in Makerspaces at schools and libraries are aimed at technological innovation and aquiring 21st century skillsets. Students in schools today, can learn how to make their own games, or access 3D printers. EDtech in schools now offer instructional frameworks which encourage teachers and students to use digital tools that foster creativity along with production skills. Other than just trying to engage students, schools are convinced that these skills of creativity and production will help students succeed in high education and the workforce. This statement is very valid for genY and Z, well done!

  • #2880

    Samantha Maddox
    Participant

    Hey Nat, what a great idea of bringing the maker space into a hospital! For children that are subjected to some childhood illnesses can see them having such long stays in hospital, they would have ideas and concepts of what things they could make to make their journey easier. I guess also it would be a good distraction for them too. Children who are hospitalised seem to carry the identity of being ‘the sick kid’ but as you said, they can be the agents of change and this concept could emotionally pull a child out of their bed. Nice post 🙂

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